HyperX is ready to take over your entire PC gaming setup.

Kingston’s gaming brand revealed today at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas that it is rolling out several new versions of its Alloy mechanical gaming keyboard and the Pulsefire gaming mouse. The Alloy, which I called a brilliant first effort in late 2016, will now come with an option for Red or Brown Cherry MX switches that are quieter than the Blue switches in the original. But HyperX is also introducing a larger version of the Alloy with RGB LED lighting and dedicated media keys. The Pulsfire gaming mouse includes an optical sensor and four preset DPI settings so you don’t need software to get different sensitivity.

The Alloy FPS Red and Brown will debut this month for $100. The Pulsefire will ship in April for $50. And the Alloy RGB will launch in Q3 of this year, and HyperX plans to reveal the price at a future date. By expanding its product offerings to gamers, HyperX is hoping to capture even more spending in this lucrative offshoot of the PC peripheral market.

“Our range of gaming gear makes even a casual gamer feel like a pro,” HyperX marketing boss Daniel Kelley said in a statement. “HyperX is used by esports champions and casual players alike because the products deliver the performance and quality they need to win. We are absolutely committed to creating the best gear on the market for all gamers – PC, console, or mobile – at an attainable price.”

With these additions, HyperX is giving gamers the options that they want. Cherry MX switches are massively popular actuators for mechanical keyboards, but many people prefer the quiet action of the Red and Brown over the noisy clack of the Blues. Now, when gamers go to a retailer like Amazon, they’ll get a drop-down menu to choose the exact switch that they want.

The Alloy RGB, with its media keys and lighting, offers up the same performance of the Alloy FPS, but it does so with the kinds of features that make it more appealing to a casual consumers as opposed to a diehard Counter-Strike competitor.

The Pulsefire, with its ability to jump from a DPS setting (which affects sensitivity) of 400, 800, 1,600, or 3,200 with the push of the button, means it should serve most hardcore gamers needs without needing heavy apps running in the background. I know that I, personally, only ever use a DPS of 400 and 800, and those are among the most common options for pro gamers as well.

And now HyperX can find its niche throughout your PC gaming rig. While it has made memory for gamers for more than a decade, it can now offer you products like gaming headsets, keyboards, and mice.

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