Nvidia is announcing today that it is going to supersize PC gaming with a new breed of Big Format Gaming Displays — or BFGDs.

Nvidia is helping hardware partners Acer, Asus, and HP to integrate a high-end 65-inch, 4K, 120Hz HDR display with Nvidia’s G-Sync technology and the Nvidia Shield set-top streaming box. Nvidia says this will deliver a “buttery-smooth” gaming experience and media streaming apps on a giant screen. Nvidia is showing the technology at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show (CES), the big tech trade show in Las Vegas this week.

“PC gamers expect high performance and instant response times, but, until now, they’ve been largely limited to traditional desktop displays,” said Matt Wuebbling, head of GeForce marketing at Nvidia, in a statement. “BFGDs change that. With Nvidia’s latest technology built into these new displays, PC gamers can now experience their favorite titles in all the low-latency glory they deserve.”

At the heart of the BFGDs is the latest G-Sync HDR technology, which synchronizes the display’s 120Hz refresh rate to that of the game at each moment. This G-Sync Variable Refresh Rate technology delivers a highly responsive, smooth, tear-free, immersive gaming experience unmatched by any display of this size. By tear free, it means that the screen won’t suffer errors — where the screen appears to tear — in displaying fast-moving images.

Above: Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang at CES 2018.

Image Credit: Dean Takahashi

Additionally, the 4K HDR display features a full direct-array backlight, 1,000-nit peak luminance, and DCI-P3 color gamut for high visual quality.

G-SYNC technology brings the ultra-low latency of desktop gaming monitors to the BFGD when gaming directly on the PC, Android, another console, or using Nvidia GameStream technology from a desktop or laptop gaming PC.

The integration of the Android TV-based Shield into BFGDs allows players to easily switch between gaming and other forms of entertainment.

G-SYNC HDR technology also supports video playback at native framerates, including popular 23.976, 24, and 25 FPS formats. This matches the screen’s refresh rate to the video source’s actual frame rate, eliminating interpolation and presenting the video content as the director intended for viewers.

General availability, pricing, and further specifications should come this summer.