HyperX has plenty of options for gaming headsets, and its latest offering is the Cloud Alpha. It is available now for $100, and it acts as the followup to HyperX’s Cloud II.

The big upgrade here is dual-chamber system for its sound drivers that enables the high and mid tones to reverberate in a separate sound compartment from the bass. HyperX claims this design provides distinct audio with less frequent distortion.

And from my experience, it works.

What you’ll like

Dual-chamber sound

Whether I was testing the Cloud Alpha on a console through a controller, on a PC through an amplifier, or on a phone through a USB-C adapter, the Cloud Alpha always produced bright, full audio. In games, music, and movies, it drove heavy bass without ever overwhelming or eating the mids and highs.

The only issue I noticed is that sudden bursts of high-frequency sounds could experience slight distortion, but it only ever happened for a fleeting moment.

It also has a really high-quality microphone that should ensure everyone can understand you on Discord and Teamspeak.

Comfy, lightweight fit

When I go a while without using a HyperX headset, I’m startled at just how comfortable they are. The Cloud Alpha is no different.

It is feather light. It distributes its hold on your head evenly across the arc of its body, and it doesn’t bounce out of place. That’s surprising consider the Cloud Alpha doesn’t squeeze my head, which is something I don’t mind, but I can see most people preferring the Alpha because you could wear it for hours without any issues.

What you won’t like

Some sacrificed features

The Cloud Alpha doesn’t have mic monitoring, and its in-line controls are limited.

I want mic monitoring for online gaming because hearing my voice alongside game audio and my friends on Discord is crucial. If I sound muffled or quiet, I might start yelling or get preoccupied with what I’m saying to the point that it is a distraction. The Cloud Alpha doesn’t include this feature because its only connection option is the 3.5mm headphone jack. You can still hear yourself fine in a lot of circumstances, but my voice occasionally gets lost in the fray of intense combat and yelling.

When it comes to the controls, you don’t have a play/pause button, which is standard for a lot of gaming headsets. I still want it though. If I buy a $100 gaming headset, I want to retract or remove the microphone and take it with me to use as my my music headset as well. No play/pause button means I’d choose something else.

The volume dial also doesn’t make it easy to know if you’re turning it up or down. You have to test it each time, which means you might occasionally turn the volume way up when you meant to lower a loud scene.

Conclusion

For gaming headsets, I care about two things above all else: comfort and sound quality. HyperX has nailed both of these since its original HyperX Cloud, and the Alpha continues that tradition. It is easy to wear for long periods of time, and it delivers rich sounds that will bring your games to life.

I highly recommend it for anyone looking for a 3.5mm gaming headset.

The HyperX Cloud Alpha is available now for $100. HyperX provided a sample unit for the purpose of this review.