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Check Point said that its researchers discovered vulnerabilities in the massively popular online game Fortnite. The security software company notified Fortnite maker Epic Games, which patched the flaw, which could have enabled hackers to secretly intercept and steal Fortnite users’ login credentials.

The attack manipulates Fortnite’s login process to capture users’ Fortnite usernames and passwords. With the stolen credentials, attackers could then log in to the user’s Fortnite account and view any data stored there, buy more V-Bucks in-game currency at the user’s expense, and access all the user’s in-game contacts as well as listen in on and record conversations taking place during game play.

Fortnite has nearly 80 million players across Android, iOS, PC, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4.

For the attack to be successful, all a victim needs to do is click on a malicious phishing link the attacker sends them, either in Fortnite chat, or via social media — for example, offering free game credits or V-Bucks. Once clicked, with no need even for the user to enter any login credentials, their Fortnite authentication token is captured by the attacker, allowing them to take over the user’s account.

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Check Point’s researchers informed Epic Games of this vulnerability and a fix has now been deployed.

Hackers have figured out a way to hack Fortnite accounts.

Above: Security researchers have figured out a way to access Fortnite accounts.

Image Credit: Check Point Research

While Fortnite players had previously been targeted by scams that deceived them into logging into fake websites that promised to generate Fortnite’s ‘V-Buck’ currency, these new vulnerabilities could have been exploited without the player handing over any login details.

Attackers could have potentially gained access to a user’s account through vulnerabilities discovered in Fortnite’s user login process. Due to three flaws found in Epic Games’ web infrastructure, researchers were able to manipulate the token-based authentication process used by Fortnite in conjunction with Single Sign-On (SSO) systems such as Facebook, Google, Xbox, and PlayStation to steal the user’s access credentials and take over their account.

To fall victim to this attack, a player needs only to click on a crafted phishing link coming from a genuine Epic Games domain, which makes the link appear legitimate. Once clicked, the user’s Fortnite authentication token could be captured by the attacker without the user entering any login credentials. According to Check Point’s researchers, the potential vulnerability originated from flaws found in two of Epic Games’ sub-domains online that were susceptible to a malicious redirect, allowing users’ legitimate authentication tokens to be intercepted by a hacker from the compromised sub-domain.

“Fortnite is one of the most popular games played mainly by kids. These flaws provided the ability for a massive invasion of privacy,” said Oded Vanunu, head of products vulnerability research for Check Point, in a statement. “Together with the vulnerabilities we recently found in the platforms used by drone manufacturer DJI, show how susceptible cloud applications are to attacks and breaches. These platforms are being increasingly targeted by hackers because of the huge amounts of sensitive customer data they hold. Enforcing two-factor authentication could mitigate this account takeover vulnerability.”

Check Point notified Epic Games of the vulnerability, which has now been fixed. Check Point and Epic Games advise all users to remain vigilant whenever exchanging information digitally, and to practice safe cyber habits when engaging with others online. Users should also question the legitimacy of links to information seen on user forums and websites.

“We were made aware of the vulnerabilities and they were soon addressed. We thank Check Point for bringing this to our attention,” said an Epic spokesman, in an email. “As always, we encourage players to protect their accounts by not re-using passwords and using strong passwords, and not sharing account information with others.”

To avoid this, Check Point said organizations must perform thorough and regular hygiene checks on their IT infrastructure they have not left outdated and unused sites or access points online. In addition, it is good practice to review any outdated website or sub-domains that may still be online though not in use.

In order to minimize the threat of falling victim to an attack that exploits vulnerabilities like this, users should enable two-factor authentication, ensuring that when logging into their account from a new device, the player would need to enter a security code sent to the account holder’s email addresses. It is also important that parents make their children aware of the threat of online fraud and warn them that cyber criminals will do anything to gain access to personal and financial details which may be held as part of a gamer’s online account.

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