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Roblox announced today that it has settled a lawsuit filed by the National Music Publishers Association (NMPA). The lawsuit from the NMPA has been summarily dismissed, and Roblox will be open to further agreements with artists who want to debut their music in the game world, as they can now make their own deals with Roblox.

The NMPA originally sued Roblox for about $200 million for copyright infringement. Now the two companies appear to have come to an agreement that will allow music within the metaverse, or at least it will give publishers the chance to decide whether or not they are willing to allow it. NMPA President David Israelite called Roblox “a unique platform for musicians and songwriters in the metaverse” and said it offers unique options for artists to connect with fans.

According to the NMPA, this new settlement will allow Roblox to broker more agreements with music publishers going forward. They now have “an industry-wide opt-in open to all eligible NMPA publishers” with Roblox as well as a negotiating period that allows publishers to work out individual licensing contracts. The NMPA adds that these deals will offer new ways for songwriters to monetize their music.

Roblox has recently begun expanding its music offerings, most recently with the addition of Listening Parties — in-game music streams in which artists can show off their work. It’s also held several virtual concerts within its metaverse for users. Roblox’s Global Head of Music Jon Vlassopulos said in a statement: “We are pleased that the publishing industry sees the potential of Roblox to be a significant creative and commercial opportunity for its members.”

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The NMPA also recently settled a similar issue with Twitch, wherein it didn’t exactly condone the widespread use of licensed music on the platform, but it did leave the possibility open for individual artists or labels to have their own deals with the platform — an “opt-in” it described in almost identical language to its settlement with Roblox. The NMPA said this agreement will allow artists to find their audiences: “From virtual shows to studio sessions, the partnerships stemming from this agreement will connect the Twitch community in many ways to the music they enjoy.”

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