Mobile

Samsung not planning to bring Galaxy Tab 7.7 and Galaxy Note to the U.S.

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After a strong debut at the IFA 2011 conference earlier this week, Samsung said it has no intention of bringing its Galaxy Tab 7.7 and Galaxy Note devices to the United States, according to Gotta Be Mobile.

Samsung played coy and gave us a non-answer when we asked about the development. “Samsung has not made any formal announcements about availability in any parts of the world,” a Samsung spokesperson said.

Both the Galaxy Tab 7.7 and Galaxy Note seem like solid entries into the tablet space, but Samsung may intend for them to be European products only.

The Galaxy Tab 7.7 runs Android Honeycomb and includes a 7.7-inch Super AMOLED Plus display with 1280×800 resolution, dual-core 1.4-GHz processor, and HSPA+ connectivity. The original U.S. Galaxy Tab has less impressive components, a 7-inch screen and an older version of Android.

Then there’s the Galaxy Note, which is a weird beast that straddles the line between smartphone and tablet much like the Dell Streak tried to. It has a 5.3-inch Super AMOLED Plus display, 1.4-GHz dual-core processor, front-facing 2-megapixel camera, rear-facing 8-megapixel camera, and it’s HSPA+ and LTE capable.

A decision by Samsung not to bring either device to the U.S. makes sense if you consider Samsung’s other recent product announcements. First, Samsung is reportedly planning to launch the Galaxy Tab 8.9 tablet in the U.S. and since that’s only slightly different from the 7.7, offering both devices could cause market confusion.

Second, Samsung just announced the new line of Galaxy S II phones aimed at U.S. consumers. These powerful Android smartphones will launch this fall on AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile. Because the Galaxy Note has a 5.3-inch screen and the similarly styled Galaxy S II phones have either a 4.3-inch or 4.5-inch screen, consumers might mix up the Note and S II devices.

Would you have been interested in picking up the Galaxy Tab 7.7 or Note?