Media

Original web series ‘Leap Year’ season 2 features Alexis Ohanian, Randi Zuckerberg & others

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In the early days of television and radio, some companies paid nearly the entire production cost as an experimental form of advertising (e.g. Ralphie’s decoder message from A Christmas Story). When it comes to the growing world of original web series, the same is also true.

Such is the case with big insurance company Hiscox, which is attempting to gain the attention of the small online business crowd by producing an original web series. Today, the company announced that it had ordered a second season of Leap Year, a half-hour web show comedy about (what else) five friends running tech startup C3D. It’s first season garnered over five million views across multiple streaming video channels.

The show isn’t exactly an amateur effort either. Hiscox is collaborating with CJP Digital Media and Happy Little Guillotine Films on the show, which will feature plenty of established actors like Steven Weber (Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip), Emma Caulfield (Buffy the Vampire Slayer), and Craig Bierko (The Three Stooges) as well as Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian, Randi Zuckerberg, Zaarly CEO Bo Fishback, and What’s Trending Host Shira Lazar. The show also name checks plenty of others in the tech investment world, including TechStars founder David Cohen and others.

Filming for the new season of Leap Year Begins next week, with episodes due out this summer on Hulu and Hulu Plus.

Projects like Leap Year are bound to sprout up more frequently going forward. And will all the attention surrounding tech startups as the future innovators of television, it makes perfect sense to target this type of crowd first. Check out the trailer recap for the first season below and let us know what you think. Is this as good as (or better) than the laugh-track prime time sitcoms on the major networks?