Wondering why Google’s homepage is a working synthesizer today?

Google is celebrating the birthdate of Robert Moog, the inventor of the Moog synthesizer. How? Oh nothing major, they just converted the logo on the most-used search engine in the universe into a working synthesizer. Users can record their creations to their Google+ pages for public sharing, similar to last year’s Les Paul tribute.

Robert Moog

Above: Robert Moog

The interactive Google Doodle was created by “Chief Doodler” Ryan Germick and Google Engineer Joey Hurst, and took nearly four months of development. Hurst spent his free time (where Google allows its employees to do whatever they want) building the synthesizer, but it wasn’t until the recent Web Audio API was added to Google Chrome that the project finally reached its full potential. The API allows for high-quality low-latency audio in a web browser (Chrome, to be specific). And that’s a necessity here, as the Google synthesizer has over 20 functioning keys, knobs, doodads, and doohickeys from which your auditory masterpieces can be birthed.

Moog Music will be donating 50 percent of online sales today to the Bob Moog Foundation. Also in celebration of Robert Moog’s accomplishments, the Animoog app (normally $10) is on sale for a dollar on iTunes. The iPad version (normally $30) is on sale for $10.

As a diehard fan of chiptunes and electronica, I plan to record a few beats of my own to honor Moog. Unfortunately, most of the music I make causes dogs to howl several blocks away, but whatever. Happy birthday, Moog!

Below is a guide to using the Google Moog synthesizer (click for full size). Come back and link us to your tunes if you make anything cool. We are partial to Super Mario remixes and 80’s cartoon themes. 

Moog Doodle Guide


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