ChickRx recruits doctors and helpful sexperts for its health platform

ChickRx, a health and wellness startup aimed at women, today rolled out a new platform for female users to seek medical advice from the experts. Cofounders Stacey Borden and Meghan Muntean said the site, too often been pegged as the “WebMD for women,” delivers a new kind of health education.

“WebMD doesn’t answer questions about whether birth control affects arousal or about supporting friends with breast cancer,” Muntean said. “This is important information women need to know and didn’t have a place to discover.”

The founders said they recruited top cardiologists and gynecologists to contribute to the site by tapping into a network of media-friendly physicians regularly quoted in women’s health magazines.

Their biggest get? Famed New York-based sexologist and sex educator, Amy Levine. Another notable contributor is internist Dr. Andrea Ruman, whose description of the signs and treatments for irritable bowel syndrome in an interview titled “IBS: It Beats Syphilis,” is typical of the animated and accessible “ChickRx” style.

The pair of Harvard and Princeton graduates in theirs 20s developed the site, and they have tailored the content to women in their age group. You can find condensed news from medical journals, as well as questions and answers about such subjects as weight loss and diet, sex and relationships, and preventative health.

“There is a perception that online health is sterile,” said Borden, when asked about their vision for the startup. “We wanted to take a fun approach with ChickRx that mirrors how people do want to talk about their health and relationships every day.”

The founders say there is no financial incentive available, but the health experts on board are passionate about providing the site’s community of women — 2,000 and growing — with accurate information they can’t obtain from a Google search.

ChickRx faces competition from popular Q&A startup, HealthTap, which is not targeted to any specific demographic, and traditional women’s health magazines like Self and Women’s Health.

The startup has raised $550,000 in seed funding, and it counts Kevin Donahue, formerly of YouTube, among its investors.