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Mayer missing from Yahoo’s earnings call, though we’ll “hear from her soon”

Yahoo has been around the block once or twice when it comes to picking out its CEOs, and it may be a little more protective with its latest tap, Marissa Mayer. Mayer was not on the company’s earnings call today and did not provide future financial guidance to give her time to settle in.

“Obviously this is a very exciting and dynamic day to have our earnings call. Since this is Marissa’s first day on the job she will not be joining us on the call today,” said Mors. “I’m sure you’ll hear from her soon.”

Of course, with a new CEO in place, you can really expect the earnings call to go more like this:

Analyst: What color is the sky today?

Morse: Well, I haven’t yet had that opportunity to go outside. So, it’s hard to tell at this point. The blinds are currently shut. They may open later, at which point I will be able to give you more.”

Of course, Mayer had nothing to do with Yahoo’s performance this quarter, and would only be inundated with questions about her future at Yahoo, which she is undoubtedly figuring out as we speak.

“Marissa was named in the last 24 hours, needs time to get in, get acclimated, get to know the business,” said Morse. “We haven’t discussed guidance with her yet.”

Interim CEO Ross Levinsohn was also missing from the call.

Mayer follows Scott Thompson, who lasted four months in the position before being ousted after padding his resume with a fake degree in computer science.

The person who initiated the investigation into Thompson’s past, majority outstanding shareholder Dan Loeb, is now on Yahoo’s board of directors.

Mayer officially resigned from Google Monday and began her first day on the job today. She was Google’s first female engineer, and its twentieth employee overall. But while she held an executive position at Google, was credited with the company’s sleek homepage design, and was otherwise a Google figurehead, VentureBeat writer Jolie O’Dell suggests she had no more room to move up. And thus, she moved out and up to Yahoo, a company with a bit of an identity problem.