Media

Amazon gets in bed with NBC to bring more video babies to Prime

Image Credit: NBC/Parks and Recreation
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Amazon and NBC have been getting down to business, and the fruits of their labors are more instant video offerings for Amazon Prime customers.

In case you’ve still got cable or something (hah! you oldster), Amazon Prime’s Instant Video service is the company’s Hulu/Netflix competitor. It serves slews of movies and TV shows to paying customers, who also get e-book and free shipping perks along with discounts on many products.

As of today, NBC shows such as like Parks and Recreation, Parenthood, Friday Night Lights, Heroes, and Battlestar Galactica become part of the Prime Instant Video lineup.

“We continue to invest heavily in our content selection for Prime members and have now reached over 22,000 movies and TV episodes available instantly with unlimited streaming,” said Amazon digital video content acquisition director Brad Beale in a statement on the news.

“We are excited to be working with NBCUniversal to add their award-winning lineup of TV shows such as Parks and Recreation and Friday Night Lights to Prime Instant Video.”

Amazon’s total Instant Video library includes 120,000 titles available for rental or purchase. Prime members, who pay a flat $80 annual fee for Prime membership, are able to view more than 22,000 movies and TV episodes from the overall Instant Video library at no additional charge.

Amazon has been doing hella deals to bring more videos to Prime in particular. Back in February, the company signed on with MTV, VH1, Comedy Central, and a few others to get their popular shows onto the online video service. Discovery Channel and Animal Planet got on board the following month, with MGM and Warner Bros. following suit in June and July, respectively.

And earlier this month, Amazon launched a new iPad app for Instant Video gratification that media correspondent Tom Cheredar said would “eat [Netflix's] lunch.”