Media

ClipClock helps you find and share the best online video moments

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clipclock

If someone has ever sent you a long YouTube video and told you to start at a certain time, it can take a few moments to find what the heck they want you to watch. New startup ClipClock wants to solve this problem by letting you start right at the timestamp.

ClipClock’s service helps users collect and share the best moments from YouTube and Vimeo videos by starting them at a certain point. People can comment on these best moments and share them with their family and friends using Facebook and Twitter. ClipClock also has an iPhone app so someone can shoot a video on their phone, comment on it, and upload it to ClipClock.

“I founded and took up the CEO role in this company with the belief that people will need to handle online video differently,” ClipClock CEO Alexey Krainov told VentureBeat via email. “It is so huge a market with so big players that it’s hard to think about changing the game. But the simplicity of our idea, the need for relevant content and fun products — really [made us] go for it.”

The company claims that its mobile app can help videos go viral. “Moments are more relevant than the entire video,” Krainov told the audience on stage at DEMO today (pictured, left). “We can highlight the best moments from a video from any mobile phone.”

Krainov argues that ClipClock is important because the number of videos online is rapidly growing and the lengths of these videos are growing. “The more and the longer videos are, the more important becomes the availability of the relevant video content for each user of online video,” he said.

The panel of sages that took the stage after the company’s launch were impressed, but had some advice for the founders. Dave Hagan, CEO of Boingo Wireless, said the key to successful video technology is that it’s intuitive and easy to use — “it’s all about the UI.”

Moscow and San Francisco-based ClipClock has raised $750,000 in seed funding, and Krainov says a $2 million first round is “on the way.” The company has nine employees.

Check out the video below for more on ClipClock:

ClipClock is one of 75 companies and 6 student “alpha” startups chosen by VentureBeat to launch at the DEMO Fall 2012 event taking place this week in Silicon Valley. After we make our selections, the chosen companies pay a fee to present. Our coverage of them remains objective.