B.org, M.org, or UR.org sound good? Public Interest Registry releases 94 never-used short domain names

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Startups have names like BizeeBee and Erply for a reason, and it’s not just the need to look and sound cool. Rather, good domain names are hard to find.

So it’s good news that the Public Interest Registry, the organization that manages dot-org domain names, is releasing 94 coveted short domain names, each with only one or two characters. However, this has a catch: You’ll need to apply for the name you want, and you need to the type of organization that reflects the “core attributes” of the .ORG brand … and reinforce its trust and value.

The available domain names include 1.org, 2.org, and so on. Some are also fun options for science-fiction groups, like B.org, or creepy types who don’t spell well, such as M.org. Imagine the possibilities, however, for community-minded groups who want to encourage participation. UR.org looks pretty ripe for the picking.

Z.org is again on the science-fictiony side — remember the character in the Bruce Willis pic The Fifth Element — but it would also be great for the multiplayer space game ZorgEmpire, if the owners of that game could convince the Public Interest Registry that a space fantasy game with barely clothed babes, unbridled capitalism, and internecine warfare uploads the trust and value of the .ORG brand.

One good thing: All proceeds from the sale go to charitable causes, such as programs that “enhance the open development and security of the Internet, particularly in technologically underserved parts of the world,” and “empower noncommercial organizations to have an effective online presence.”

All the available domain names, and details about how to apply for them, are available at Project 94.

photo credit: Eddi van W. via photopin cc