Business

Forget the electoral college: What if each click was a vote?

You’ve likely gone and voted and are now watching the results as they unfold. But what if it wasn’t the issues and polls that informed your vote, but rather the headlines floating around the Internet? What if a click was a vote?

Visual Revenue helps those in digital media look at what stories and features of their homepage are being used and how (disclosure VentureBeat has used Visual Revenue). It watched a number of outlets to see what kinds of headlines got the highest click-through-rates and asked how the election would turn out if each of those clicks was actually a vote for the candidate features in that article.

The team looked at clicks in just the United States and then the world overall. Based on headlines clicked in just the U.S., Obama comes out on top at 51 percent. If you add Europe into the mix, however, Romney edges the current president out with 53 percent.

Headlines with the vice president’s name in it didn’t exactly help their running mate’s case, however. Looks like the percentage of headlines clicked per vice presidential candidate were nearly the same as the presidential candidates, giving them no extra lead.

Check out the rest of the As for waht the headlines actually said, most of them used the obvious “Romney” and “Obama” names, but they also included “drone,” “vote,” and “last.” They also included the mention of statistician Nate Silver more times than the vice president candidates’ names.

Check out more in the infographic below:

Visual revenue us election click data

Dewey Defeats Truman image via mbell1975/Flickr


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