Big Data

DataStax nabs $45M to dominate the global ‘enterprise NoSQL’ market

DataStax, the company that wants to bring down Oracle’s relational database, has scored yet more venture funding.

Today, it announced a massive financing round of $45 million, which will be used to market its “NoSQL” database to large corporations. DataStax is a popular option for fast-growing tech companies in Silicon Valley; existing customers include eBay, Adobe, and Netflix.

DataStax also intends to further its expansion in Europe, which began last quarter.

The company’s pitch is that unlike the relational database, it is equipped to handle higher velocity and volumes of data. It sells products built on top of the open source NoSQL data store Apache Cassandra, which it melds together with Hadoop.

Cassandra is quite popular with a niche group of developers — and has been steadily growing its user base over the years, in part due to the efforts of DataStax. MongoDB is in mode in open source circles; enterprise darling 10Gen raised $42 million in 2012.

Cassandra still has a powerful ally in Facebook, which is where it got its start.

Facebook’s engineers developed the database for its Inbox Search system. Dubbed Cassandra in 2009, it was later distributed to the open source community, although it’s not entirely clear why Facebook wouldn’t hold on to a technical advantage. In 2010, two former Rackspace engineers formed a company to provide commercial support to Cassandra developers. DataStax is an evolution of this vision to offer a SQL-free database to large businesses.

In a recent interview with VentureBeat, DataStax CEO Billy Bosworth referred to the NoSQL databases as a “technology shift that will forever change how we interact with data.”

Investors agree. Since 2010, the company has raised over $83 million in funding to help businesses migrate away from Oracle.

The funding round was led by Scale Venture Partners with participation from existing investors Lightspeed Venture Partners, Crosslink Capital, and Meritech Capital Partners and new investors DFJ Venture Capital and Next World Capital.


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