Business

Twitter might kill its music app (which you probably didn’t know it had)

Image Credit: John Koetsier

Twitter #Music, the app you didn’t know existed, could soon be on its way out.

The app, which launched on iOS back in April, was meant to change the way people find and share new songs online. But it hasn’t quite lived up to its promise, and the soon-to-be-public Twitter is on the verge of killing it, as AllThingsD reports.

The news isn’t entirely surprising if you’ve been paying attention to the app’s progress over the past few months. Back in June mobile analytics company Onavo found that, despite the app’s strong launch, the install base of Twitter #Music dropped a staggering 62 percent only a month later. 

twitter-music-onavo

Above: Twitter #Music’s decline is one of the more pronounced ones Onavo has followed — a dubious distinction, to be sure.

The situation hasn’t improved much as of late. The latest numbers from Onavo paint roughly the same picture: Twitter #Music’s market share and active users are tanking, and it’s not clear what will turn the situation around.

(Oh, and case you’re under the impression that Onavos numbers are an anomaly, fellow analytics company App Annie’s own numbers are similarly uninspiring.)

Not many people will mourn the app’s death, though. Kevin Thau, the business development exec who launched #Music, left Twitter at the end of May to chase other things, and there doesn’t seem to be much support for the app coming from Twitter itself.

Twitter isn’t giving up on its musical pursuits, though. The company recently inked deals with the likes of both Apple and Rdio, and it’s also made the high-profile hire of Topspin Media SVP Bob Moczydlowsky to be its new head of music.

So yes, Twitter’s music business will go on — though it’ll likely be without Twitter #Music.


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