Education

Web 101: Mozilla's next act teaches people how to use the Internet — for free

Mozilla

Mozilla is now in the education business.

The nonprofit browser-maker is offering free Internet courses to anybody who wants them — yes, whomever wants them — starting today. Recipients in any country, in any age group or money bracket, can get comprehensive web literacy classes. Now. At the click of a mouse. All you need is a computer.

“There are still lots of people who don’t understand how the Web works,” said Mozilla spokesperson Erica Sackin.

The courses are in conjunction with the company’s Mozilla’s Maker Party, where volunteers affiliated with Mozilla teach web literacy classes to those who want it. In 2013, for example, Mozilla volunteers threw 1,700 teaching events in 331 cities.

The educational facet for Mozilla’s new endeavor is focusing on four key areas: basics of the web ecosystem; developing educational resources; open and participatory learning; and how to connect and leverage similar communities around the world.

Truth be told, it is an honest and important offering. And Mozilla, who loves an open Internet, is partnering with P2PU to make it happen. The classes are open to the plain curious or those learning how to code. Engineers and educators will lead the adventure.

According to Mozilla:

“Basic web skills are key to education and success in the future, but too often what we define those skills as stops at basic code. While important, knowing CSS or HTML won’t help you understand how to protect your online data, or what security means, or the definition of a URL. That’s why Mozilla is training educators to teach comprehensive web literacy — the full mechanics, culture and citizenship of the Web — for free.”

You can access Mozilla’s terms of service for the classes here.

While Mozilla throws virtual teaching parties annually, this marks the first time the company is offering multiple criteria at the same time.

“We’ve never offered this kind of training before,” Sackin said.

Sackin said she didn’t know how much the program was costing the company but said it’s a major initiative for the Mozilla Foundation, the nonprofit arm of the browser maker.

Free education is always good.

More information:

Mozilla is a thriving community of intelligent, principled and passionate individuals who build software to preserve choice, openness and innovation on the Internet. As part of this mission, Mozilla develops and distributes the popular... read more »

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