OffBeat

Find out if Google’s driverless car is legal in your state

Image Credit: Mojo Motors

This map reveals where driverless cars are street-legal, and which states are stuck in legislative limbo.

In 2011, Nevada became the first state to legalize the testing of driverless cars. California later followed suit. As Mojo Motors’ map details, progress in this space continues: recently California announced plans to begin issuing licenses for autonomous cars this September.

Google’s recently released prototype — a car which forgoes a steering wheel, mirrors, and pedals — reignited excitement over driverless cars, although the company’s work in the space is far from new.

Google’s driverless cars have also faced criticism. The taxi and limousine industry does not appear happy with Uber’s interest in adopting driverless vehicles, and numerous competing firms, like Mobileye, believe they can do a better job.

For more on the state of driverless cars, head here.

More information:

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9 comments
Darren Steinbook
Darren Steinbook

Dave that's still a major problem . With the current problems of texting and driving, what do you think people will be doing with a self driving car? And accident avoidance still will be programmed into the car.

Dave Tarantula
Dave Tarantula

I think all states will make it required that you can override the car if you see an error or accident coming on. No way how companies even the state governments are going to let computers make that decision.

Darren Steinbook
Darren Steinbook

Major flaw in autonomous cars, at some point a computer programmer is going to have to determine life and death. Example you see a car about to hit you head one, there is a van full of kids next to you on the right. You could swerve to the left and take out the van and killing all the kids in order to save your own life or do nothing and die yourself in a head on collision. Who now gets to sue Google? The parents if the van full of dead kids or your family because the computer did not save you? These kind if decision of life and death will have to be baked into the computer if the car. As much as self driving cars sound cool, I don't think we will ever see in mass.

UsaIndia MediaInc
UsaIndia MediaInc

I dont believe the driverless car news unless I see it for myself. Else it may be just a pr and marketing tactic of Google.

Mike Morgan
Mike Morgan

For a second it thought this was the onion.

Conrad Dunkerson
Conrad Dunkerson

I don't think that kind of decision will ever be an issue.


The cars will be programmed to obey the law and avoid doing anything which could harm others. Side-swiping a van full of kids could harm them... therefor an autonomous car would not do it. Driving directly into another vehicle could cause harm... therefor an autonomous car would not do that either. Instead, if there were no other option, an autonomous car would slow down as much as possible to reduce the speed of the collision. The human driver, and it would have to be a human driver, in the other car might still hit the autonomous vehicle head on, but there is nothing the car can do about that. It obeyed the laws and did everything it could to avoid harm. By NOT making life and death decisions the autonomous vehicles would leave that responsibility in the hands of human drivers... and every time that results in a fatality it will be another reason to ban human drivers. Once fully autonomous vehicles are on the road anywhere in the world their advantages will result in them quickly being allowed everywhere... and once that happens the drawbacks of continued human driving will result in that quickly being illegal in most cases. Before 2050 seeing a human driving a car will be as rare as seeing an autonomous vehicle today.