Teens. Since the beginning of humanity, they’ve always represented what the future of humanity would look like. Now, thanks to a new survey, we have an idea of what kinds of websites, apps, and online services the future of humanity will enjoy– at least for the next few years of existence. Then, an entirely new crop of startups replaces the upstarts that recently rose to power.

Curator startup Niche conducted a sizable survey of 7,000 teens, and this is what it found:

Popularity in general


Facebook and Youtube reign supreme, with 61 percent and 55 percent of daily active users, respectively. Instagram and the Facebook-nemesis team over at Snapchat are neck-and-neck in the race for photo sharing apps (around 50 percent).

Signs are good for the beleaguered micro-messaging app, Twitter, with 35 percent, a trend that has seen dramatic growth over the past two years.

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The sad panda award goes to Foursquare, with a self-reported zero-percent daily active userbase among teens (3 percent overall). Of course, there are certainly teens that use Foursquare daily, but not enough to be picked up in a pretty large survey.

Finally, no shocker: The largely unemployed slice of teens legally required to attend high school do not spend much time polishing their Linkedin Profiles (2 percent daily use) — this in spite of LinkedIn’s efforts to court college applicants.

The Atlantic’s Derek Thompson has a nice graph ranking all of the popular websites/services by daily use.

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Teens must love listicles and sideboob stories: 15 percent report reading Buzzfeed occasionally, and 21 percent visit the Huffington Post. The Onion and Reddit are tied for the semi-serious news gold medal, at about 10 percent of occasional users.



YouTube dominates video with 55 percent daily users. The fact that Hulu is at around 23 percent of daily users is more evidence that teens aren’t just watching TV online — they are watching traditional TV programming much less.


Pandora leads the pack on music (37 percent), meaning that discovery could be more important than random access(14 percent report using Spotify, and 32 percent, iTunes).


You can see the full survey here.