Science

Newly discovered planet is the most Earth-like yet, scientists say

Image Credit: PHL / UPR Arecibo

Astronomers from the University of New South Wales in Australia have discovered a new planet that could be the most similar to the Earth ever observed.

The planet, dubbed Gliese 832c, is about 16 lightyears away and about five times the size of Earth. Astronomers said the planet orbits a red giant star that’s just far enough away to reasonably support life (aka the habitable zone). Scientists previously discovered a Jupiter-like cold planet Gilese 832b orbiting the same star back in 2009.

But what makes this discovery significant is that Gliese 832c receive the same average level of stellar energy as our sun gives the Earth, according to a Sci-News report.

“With an outer giant planet and an interior potentially rocky planet, this planetary system can be thought of as a miniature version of our Solar System,” professor and University of New South Wales astronomer Chris Tinney told Sci-News.

Now all we need is to get NASA’s warp drive-enabled spaceship, the Enterprise IXS, up and running so we can check it out with our own eyes.

via Gizmodo

43 comments
Gabriel Olteanu
Gabriel Olteanu

You can also check Gliese 581 system. Maybe there's a Pandora there too :)

Matt Schwagler
Matt Schwagler

Andrei you're hopeless. That is a terrible trait.

Ryan M Bertoldi
Ryan M Bertoldi

We just left 2 light years ago kids! ..now don't ask me again if we're there yet!

Ta Wil
Ta Wil

How they discover these planets?I mean how could miss a planet?

Carlos Duarte Pedrote
Carlos Duarte Pedrote

Harold White is working on an energy efficient way to achieve warp drive & make the concept possible.

Amit Dhamal
Amit Dhamal

Saturn's or Jupiter's moons are our best hope for the next century

Daniel Poludyonny
Daniel Poludyonny

It might be possible in theory and mathematical equations, but until it's proven practically, there's no use to make any plans on using it. Same applies to the space warp engine. If we learn to warp space we'll be able to create wormholes, which makes moving (even faster than light) useless. My point was, with current state of things we still can't colonize, till we find closer earth-like planets. And in my opinion, this is much more likely to happen earlier than practical implementation of traveling faster than light.

Andrei Ion Rinea
Andrei Ion Rinea

We haven't got to Mars yet but we dream of 16 light-years away travel.. Not realistic.

Jim Hellmore
Jim Hellmore

No, it could NOT be Pandora, you tits. Pandora is a moon.

David Rowe
David Rowe

We could go and polute, over- populate and start wars on it all over again!

Baig Nad
Baig Nad

I see it like a rotten earth after human has damaged its natural environment!!! I am scared to learn more about this planet.

Jennifer Reuting
Jennifer Reuting

We may not yet be able to travel faster than the speed of light (technically speaking) but we can manipulate space. Warp speed might be possible by compressing space in front of the ship and expanding it behind. Exciting things are in our near future, for sure!

John Pm
John Pm

I think that is the one that is to dense...and crazy gravity to have life...human that is..im a dork...ha

Kurt Stammberger
Kurt Stammberger

Giant-ass synthetic aperture telecopes in Lagrange orbits. Now!

Sherzod Max
Sherzod Max

Viktor, let's star packing. We are moving.

Chandler Coats
Chandler Coats

We got warp drives in the pipeline... May not be as far away as it seems.

Ray D
Ray D

This headline is just factually incorrect. It is the 3rd most Earth-like planet. Why does it matter? Because this is either clickbait or shoddy reporting yet again from VentureBeat. Poor work, Tom Cheredar. 


Evidence:


The Earth Similarity Index (ESI) of Gliese 832 c (ESI = 0.81) is comparable to Gliese 667C c (ESI = 0.84) and Kepler-62 e (ESI = 0.83). This makes Gliese 832 c one of the top three most Earth-like planets according to the ESI (i.e. with respect to Earth's stellar flux and mass) and the closest one to Earth of all three, a prime object for follow-up observations

Robin Kozelka
Robin Kozelka

How is it that we can see 16 light years away but not a million miles more and get a close up? Hmmm...?

Sam Stamper
Sam Stamper

the possibility of an another planet in the Goldilocks zone (habitable zone) is 10 to 8x power ... That is a huge number and lot of possibilities..

Robert Grand
Robert Grand

Impulse Gravity Generation as a Propulsion Source can provide infinite energy to get there and back or anywhere else. It doesn't take up a lot of space and can legitimately work as a possible space travel propulsion source solution... If you search the USPTO.gov you'll find related patents filed and patent holders that include Boeing. And traveling faster than light is possible... We just get fed false information to quiet our thoughts and minds from questioning the historical narrative...

Eric Marshall
Eric Marshall

Five times the gravity of earth will flatten your buoyant skull.

Daniel Poludyonny
Daniel Poludyonny

well, considering traveling at the speed of light is nearly impossible (as it requires almost endless amount of energy) I think the best we can beat 16 light years in is several hundred regular years, taking into account current technology. Not to mention the ability to raise some generations in zero gravity. But the trend is encouraging. Hopefully we'll find some more such planets, maybe even closer.