Security

Watch: MIT discovers how to spy on speech from a video of vibrating objects in a room

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Image Credit: Flickr
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MIT researchers have partially reconstructed speech by observing video of a vibrating bag of potato chips. Yes, you read that right: they have discovered how to spy on conversations based on the video recording of objects in the same room. The video explanation is below:

Essentially, the airwaves from sound vibrate nearby objects in a unique way. With subtle detection measures, a computer can reconstruct the pattern into sound. In the video, they demonstrate both reconstructed sound and conversation, even from commercial-grade cameras.

[tweet https://twitter.com/erikbryn/status/496358072374550530]

The technology isn’t ready for prime-time spying yet. But, given that this is academic research, it’s easy to imagine how this kind of universal spying will be available in the future. Private conversations may become a lot less private quite soon.