In its Q3 2014 earnings announcement today, Facebook revealed that it now has more than 1.35 billion monthly active users (up 14 percent year-over-year). Of those, 1.12 billion were mobile users, an increase of 29 percent year-over-year.

The company also shared it now has 864 million daily active users (an increase of 19 percent year-over-year) and 703 million mobile daily active users (up 39 percent year-over-year). While it’s great for Facebook that all these numbers are still growing, albeit slowly on a quarter-over-quarter basis, the real interesting figure is in the company’s earnings slides, on page seven:

fb_mobile_only_q3_2014

Between Q2 2014 and Q3 2014, Facebook added 57 million mobile-only users to reach 456 million total (up 12.5 percent quarter-over-quarter). Basic math tells us that mobile-only users now account for 33.78 percent, or just over one third, of the social network’s total users (a new high).

In case you’re wondering, here’s how Facebook distinguishes this category:

Mobile-only MAUs are defined as users who accessed Facebook solely through mobile apps or mobile versions of our website, or used our Messenger app, in the last 30 days of the given quarter. The number of mobile-only MAUs do not include Instagram users unless they would otherwise qualify as such users based on their other activities on Facebook.

This is important for two reasons. First, Facebook’s growth rate has been slowing for a while, which shouldn’t be surprising given its size. Second, two thirds of the company’s revenue now comes from mobile, which only further emphasizes that the social network has managed to successfully transform itself into a mobile-first business.

Here are the other four charts for the numbers Facebook traditionally highlights in its releases:

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fb_mobile_q3_2014

fb_daily_q3_2014

fb_mobile_daily_q4_2014

We think it’s only a matter of time before Facebook starts showing off mobile-only numbers right in its press releases. A third of a user base as large as Facebook’s is nothing to scoff at, and we bet it won’t be long before it reaches 50 percent.