Under terms of a new decree adopted by the French government, Internet service providers must block any websites that promote terrorism or child pornography within 24 hours of receiving an official notification.

The new rules have been under consideration since last summer, but they go into effect in the wake of the shootings last month at Charlie Hebdo and a kosher market in Paris that have already amplified the debate in France between free speech and the desire for greater security. Separately, the French government is seeking additional powers and assistance from major Internet companies such as Google and Facebook in monitoring terrorism-related content on their services.

The new rules that were adopted last week (a translation of the decree can be read here) give the French government and the French National Police the right to submit requests to ISPs regarding any content they decide is related to child pornography or terrorism that can be viewed by users in France. ISPs have 24 hours to take action and can request that the French government pay them for any costs that result.

However, the address of the sites will remain active and will display text that explains the site was blocked due to the government’s request.

The new decree drew immediate protest from La Quadrature du Net, a French organization that advocates against digital censorship, which criticized the new rules as a blow against freedom of speech as well as an ineffective approach to fighting terrorism. The group vowed to take the matter to court to get the rules repealed.

“With this decree establishing the administrative censorship for Internet content, France once again circumvents the judicial power, betraying the separation of powers in limiting what is the first freedom of all in a democracy — freedom of speech,” said Félix Tréguer, founding member of La Quadrature du Net, in a statement. “Website blocking is ineffective since it is easily circumvented. It is also disproportionate because of the risk of over-blocking perfectly lawful content, especially with the blocking technique retained by the Government. The measure only gives the illusion that the State is acting for our safety, while going one step further in undermining fundamental rights online.”