Microsoft today launched a OneNote importer tool that lets Evernote users bring their content to Microsoft’s note-taking app. You can download the OneNote Importer for Windows now from OneNote.com (a Mac version will follow “in the coming months”). Once your notes have been imported, you can access them in OneNote on your computer, phone, and the Web.

Microsoft released OneNote for Mac for free in March 2014 and then made the Windows version completely free in February 2015. The number of OneNote users has been growing steadily as a direct result of these moves as well as regular updates to all the OneNote apps. Now, the company has decided to increase the heat on the biggest player in the note-taking space.

The importer tool’s webpage even has a comparison chart:

onenote_evernote_chart

The tool requires a PC with Windows 7 or later and Evernote installed. Here it is in action:

Here is the step-by-step process (support page):

  1. Download the installer, accept the End User License Agreement, and run it.
  2. If your notes are synced locally, the OneNote Importer will automatically discover your Evernote notebooks. Pick the ones you want to import into OneNote. If not, you can import notes from an Evernote export: click Choose File, and then select the .enex file containing your Evernote notes.
  3. Select the Microsoft Account (Hotmail, Live, or Outlook.com) that you want to use with OneNote.
  4. Click Import. Once the process is complete, you can click to install OneNote on your computer and view your imported notes.
  5. When you start OneNote, it will automatically open your most recent Evernote notes for you. Open your other notebooks manually to see the rest.

You may be wondering: Why is Microsoft targeting Evernote? “We even hear from Evernote fans who acknowledge OneNote’s appeal, but are hesitant to make the switch due to fact that all their ideas and information reside in Evernote,” Microsoft claims.

That’s the nice way of putting it. Evernote is struggling and has been for a while.

In other words, Microsoft smells blood. And where there is blood, there is opportunity.