Cloud providers — those companies that store remote data — are coming around to welcome a new kind of operating system, one that updates itself not unlike Google Chrome browser. CoreOS, the fledgling startup behind this operating system, today announced that the OS can now be set up with a mouse click on the fast-growing DigitalOcean cloud.

The development points to the increasing acceptance of containers that wrap up application code and can be moved from one server environment to another with no tinkering. The startup Docker released its container technology under an open-source license last year and has accelerated the adoption of containers as an alternative to virtualization software for running multiple applications on each physical server.

CoreOS builds on top of Docker, by enabling developers to shoot their applications inside Docker containers across scores of physical servers. Google and Rackspace have partnered with CoreOS to make it possible to easily set up the Linux-based operating system on their respective cloud infrastructures. It’s also possible to boot CoreOS on the market-leading public cloud, Amazon Web Services. And with smaller but trendy DigitalOcean hopping aboard, CoreOS could become more common for applications born in the cloud.

Now CoreOS faces the grand challenge of convincing companies to run its operating system in their on-premises data centers and become a standard like Red Hat.

The recent funding round should help in that affair, along with CoreOS’ acquisition of Quay for storing private Docker files. Stay tuned to see what happens next on “The CoreOS Revolution.”