Donald Trump is officially the 45th U.S. president, and there are millions of Americans eager to see him fulfill the promises that he made during the campaign. But with all the blustering activity taking place in Washington D.C. and in politics, it can be difficult to monitor. Y Combinator president Sam Altman and his team have developed Track Trump, a website designed to track the fulfillment of concrete promises Trump has made and whether he delivers in the first 100 days of his presidency.

Altman, along with cofounders Alec Baum, Gregory Koberger, and Peter Federman, launched Track Trump with a nonpartisan aim of helping the public better understand the president’s thinking. “We believe it is important that citizens have the ability to understand and follow in real-time policy changes that will impact their lives,” the team explained on their site.

There are three goals for the site. First, it separates policy changes from “rhetoric and political theater,” which means that the site won’t cover tweets or public statements — just actual action taken. Additionally, Altman believes a dashboard view provides a more accurate and concise way to track and show what changes have been implemented. Lastly, the team hopes to hold the Trump administration accountable for promises made.

Track Trump looks at eight categories, including immigration, trade, energy and climate, federal government, economic policy, education, health care, and safety. The tracker for each category item will either appear gray for no action, yellow for steps taken, or green where policy changes have been implemented. However, if the policy fails to be implemented or it changes in an official capacity, Track Trump will denote it as red.

Because it’s not using tweets or public statements, the site will include links to the primary source materials while also providing daily summary updates for the next 100 days.

Altman said that his team started out with a focus on what Trump said in his “Contract with the American Voter” before the election — “those were clear promises that were unlikely to be misinterpreted.” However, other issues may be tracked in the future.

This is the latest political application that Altman has pursued outside of his official role at Y Combinator. Prior to the election, he launched a nonprofit called VotePlz to encourage young people to get registered to vote, even holding a sweepstakes to gamify the process.