SuperAwesome, a kid-tech company that set up a kid-safe mobile advertising platform, has announced Awesome Content Targeting (ACT): a cross-platform tool that provides deeper understanding of exactly what content kids are engaging with.

Used by the biggest brands and content-owners in the global kids entertainment market (including Cartoon Network, Hasbro, and LEGO), SuperAwesome reaches more than 300 million kids every month with ads that are COPPA compliant, which means they comply with the Children’s Online Privacy and Protection Act in the U.S.

For kids content creators and developers, ACT provides a new way to monetize content. By analyzing billions of pieces of kids content, SuperAwesome’s ACT provides a rich, contextual map of the content that kids are really engaging with.

The engine generates a layered picture of the digital kids’ media landscape, which matches kid-appropriate advertising with specific, relevant pieces of content across the digital content landscape. This provides safe new revenue streams for kids app developers.

Above: SuperAwesome targets appropriate ads at kids.

Image Credit: SuperAwesome

SuperAwesome’s ACT ensures that children will only ever see appropriate brand imagery with content they’re viewing and that children remain anonymous online. Because it uses a contextual content approach, the technology can make sure that ads are never targeted to the wrong content, an issue which has become increasingly sensitive for brands.

Joshua Wohle, chief product officer at SuperAwesome, said in a statement, “This is the next step for the kids digital media sector. Our Awesome Content Targeting technology provides the greatest intelligence on the kids content landscape ever available. It shows what content they are really engaging with, while increasing the standard for kids digital safety across the board.”

As kids TV viewing has continued to decline, brands have been shifting tens of millions of dollars into digital channels to engage the centennial audience. Analysts estimate that almost 10 percent of kids and family advertising is now being spent digitally, a figure which is likely to quintuple in the years to come as the sector catches up with other audience markets (where 50 percent digital ad spending is normal).

Industry sources expect kids digital spending this year to reach almost $1 billion across English-speaking markets. However, data privacy laws in the U.S. and Europe have led to growing fines for many players in the market — for illegally using platforms or technology that capture personal data on kids. This has led to the emergence of the “kidtech” space: compliance-driven technology companies providing platforms for safe kid engagement.

The company has offices in New York, London, Los Angeles, Singapore, and Sydney.