Amazon Web Services has joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation as a platinum member, the two organizations announced today, in a major move to support open source projects that help developers build modern applications. Adrian Cockcroft, AWS’ vice president of cloud architecture, will join the CNCF governing board.

The move shows Amazon’s commitment to some of the key open source technologies that are used to help run applications on AWS and other cloud platforms. AWS was the last of the major cloud providers to join the CNCF as a platinum member — Microsoft, Google, and IBM were already on board. (The cloud provider was already a member of the Linux Foundation, the CNCF’s parent organization.)

This also may signal a potential product shift from AWS toward increasing support of Kubernetes, container orchestration software that originated with Google and has become the CNCF’s marquee project.

Amazon already runs its own container orchestrator in the form of the company’s EC2 Container Service, but a recent report from The Information said that the company is working on developing its own service based on Kubernetes.

Cockcroft called out the container orchestrator in his blog post announcing the move, saying that AWS is planning more code contributions to the project. A recent survey of CloudNativeCon attendees showed that 63 percent of them are running containerized workloads on AWS.

The CNCF isn’t just hosting Kubernetes, however. It also guides other projects, including the containerd runtime for software containers and the Container Networking Interface (CNI). AWS previously contributed to containerd, and Cockcroft said that the platform’s future container networking features will be implemented using CNI.

In addition to all that work, Cockcroft said that he sees opportunities to propose that the CNCF incubate existing and future AWS open source projects as part of its work.

Correction 11:20 a.m. Pacific: This story originally mentioned the Amazon Elastic Container Service and Elastic Compute Service. That was incorrect. The names of the services are the Amazon EC2 Container Service and Elastic Compute Cloud, respectively. The article has been corrected to reflect that. 

Correction August 10: The CNCF originally said that its survey showed 63 percent of CloudNativeCon attendees were running Kubernetes on EC2. That was incorrect. Those people were just running containerized workloads on AWS.