Job recruiting site Indeed.com said it is partnering with three review websites — Fairygodboss, InHerSight, and Comparably — to provide better information to anyone interested in evaluating the diversity and inclusiveness of employers.

Fairygodboss and InHerSight will offer more reviews and ratings by women for women, and Indeed will team up with Comparably to provide a general diversity score for employers.

By incorporating more insight and ratings from women, Indeed will boost transparency and accountability in this area, as well as providing a resource for employers interested in creating a more diverse workplace.

Indeed also completed a study of 1,000 women in tech to get insights into what they look at when considering a job — and what is and isn’t working for them at their place of employment.

The survey found that health insurance is the No. 1 priority for over two-thirds of women. Salary is a key motivator, but 68 percent of respondents also named health care as important when considering taking a job.

Just over half (52 percent) chose vacation time, which should come as no surprise, given Americans’ strenuous work schedules. Meanwhile, 46 percent of respondents chose bonuses and regular raises, 37 percent selected regular time off, and just 26 percent cited retirement planning.

These priorities changed slightly when Indeed broke the results down by generation. For example, vacation time was most significant to Baby Boomers and Gen X’ers, with more than 55 percent of women ages 45 to 54 naming it as an important factor, compared to just 45 percent of respondents ages 16 to 24, a difference that might be attributable to younger, less-established workers’ desire to build up their career.

More than half of respondents (52 percent) who’ve been working in tech for less than a year said regular raises and bonuses are important to them. Compare this to just 29 percent of respondents who have been in the industry for 40+ years and are likely earning healthy salaries.

Only 76 percent of women in tech receive health insurance through their employers.

So are tech employers offering what female job seekers want? Yes and no. Only 76 percent of respondents said their company offers health insurance. Seventy-four percent report that their companies offer vacation time, 56 percent say they’re offered retirement planning, 50 percent work for companies with bonuses and regular raises, and just 36 percent of respondents say their companies offer performance bonuses.

About a quarter of women do not receive health care benefits through their job.

Ninety-three percent of women who have been in the industry for 40+ years reported that their companies provide vacation time, compared to just 55 percent of people who have been in the industry for one to two years.

More than half of respondents say their company benefits meet their needs “extremely well” or quite well (although “extremely well” responses were lower among employees in the 45-54 age range). Just 27 percent of respondents said their needs were met “moderately well,” and 14 percent said their needs were met only “slightly well.”

Fewer than 68 percent of respondents are satisfied with the health insurance offered at their companies, and just under 3 in 10 (29 percent) report being extremely satisfied. Contrast that with the satisfaction level for flexible time off policies (81 percent) and vacation time (74 percent).

The tech industry still has a long way to go when it comes to gender equality. Only 49 percent of respondents feel that both genders are treated equally. Of the remaining women surveyed, 36 percent feel that men receive some degree of favorable treatment.

To collect these responses, Censuswide surveyed 1,005 U.S. female workers in the technology industry on behalf of Indeed in February 2018.