Most IT desks waste an enormous amount of time repeatedly tackling the same problems, roughly 40 percent of which could be fixed via self-service. In fact, the average IT professional spends up to 78 percent of their time working on level-one customer tickets, like password resets, which works out to as much as eight hours a day on average.

LogMeIn thinks there’s a better way. The Boston, Massachusetts company today announced Prompt ai, an AI-powered employee self-service portal, and RescueAssist, a remote support solution. Together, they’re designed to minimize the friction employees experience when they encounter technical challenges large or small.

“Today, LogMeIn has taken an important first step in helping to reinvent the way companies support and empower their employees,” said LogMeIn general manager Paddy Srinivasan. “With the introduction of Prompt ai, we are bringing our expertise in AI-powered customer engagement and offering an easy yet powerful solution for the modern workforce.”

LogMeIn describes Prompt ai as an “always-on support partner” for employees — sort of like an Amazon Alexa for IT. Leveraging natural language processing, it can carry on a conversation about common problems and surface answers that might help users to solve them. Admins can program answers and tips using templates and can tap a dashboard that shows real-time analytics and a collated view of open support tickets in order of priority.

Prompt ai integrates with Slack, Microsoft Teams, and Skype for Business. And on the IT side of the equation, it connects to platforms and ticketing solutions like ServiceNow, Jira Service Desk, and Samanage, providing a straightforward way for IT teams to keep track of and escalate reports.

RescueAssist — the successor to LogMeIn’s GoToAssist — offers a deeper level of support. Through a plugin, users can start a support live session from a browser window, complete with chat, remote view, and file transfer features. As with Prompt ai, there’s in-channel support for popular messaging apps like Slack. And somewhat unusually, GoToAssist offers users the ability to start a video chat via an Android or iOS smartphone, making it easier for an IT employee to troubleshoot equipment remotely..

That last feature’s the evolution of Rescue Lens, which LogMeIn launched in 2015. It similarly allowed customer support reps to join a live smartphone camera feed.

“The ability to self-serve, combined with the ground-breaking features of RescueAssist for situations that require a human touch, allow support teams to provide an end-to-end experience that eliminates friction and increases overall productivity,” Srinivasan said.

With Prompt ai and RescueAssist, LogMeIn’s chasing after a lucrative market. The customer self-service software sector, which includes web and mobile self-service, in addition to intelligent virtual assistants, is forecast to be worth $9.38 billion by 2021, according to a report published by MarketsandMarkets.

The company has a leg up on competitors when it comes to install base. LogMeIn’s GoToMeeting, Join.me, and other cloud-hosted meeting platforms have a collective 25 million customers, and the company says it supports over 200 million customer interactions every year.

This week’s news comes three years after something of an acquisition spree. LogMeIn acquired password manager LastPass in 2015 and roughly a year ago purchased Israel-based Nanorep — which specialized in AI-powered and chatbot-centric customer service software — for a reported $45 million. More recently, in February, it snapped up Utah enterprise VoIP company Jive Communications for a cool $357 million.

LogMeIn has nearly 3,000 employees and reported revenue of more than $1 billion in 2017.