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Funding Daily: Early stage startups, get ready to fill your wallets


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Early stage startups are going to be happy with today’s funding daily. A new $282 million fund is being put to use in your honor.

Foundation capital raised the large sum of money and is scouring Silicon Valley and beyond for early stage startups to invest in. Indeed, all of the investments announced today had to do with a first or second round of funding.

So get excited, up and coming companies. It might just be your turn next.

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Foundation Capital raises 7th funding of $282M for early stage startups

Foundation Capital announced its seventh fund today, a $282 million pool of money that the venture firm plans on investing in early-stage startups. Monlo Park, Calif.-based Foundation Capital has handled a total of $2.7 billion since it was first founded 17 years ago. This firm primarily invests in early-stage companies and plans to focus this current fund on consumer technology, information technology, and clean technology. Read the full story on VentureBeat.

ParElastic pulls in $5.7M for its NoSQL & NewSQL database alternative

ParElastic closed a $5.7 million first funding round today for its technology to help companies scale their cloud-based database. Founder and CEO Kenneth Rugg (pictured, above) said the company is delivering a solution so customers won’t need to change an application code or “move off the reliability of tried and true relational database servers.” Rugg is a former vice president at Progress Software, a public company that sells business infrastructure software. The funding comes from General Catalyst Partners with participation from existing investors, including Point Judith Capital. Read the full story on VentureBeat.

Treehouse gets $7M to bring learn-to-code programs to high schools

Treehouse, a startup that’s a big part of the learn-to-code movement, has just closed a $7 million round of funding. Today, the company is also announcing it’s expanding its services to include high school classes in computer science. In the high school programs, Treehouse will come into schools with little or no computer coursework and will provide curriculum and virtual instruction, changing the lives of teens who might not otherwise get the opportunity to learn how the Internet really works. The second round of funding comes rom Kaplan Ventures and The Social+Capital Partnership. Read the full story on VentureBeat.

Nexgate nets $3.5M from Sierra to track & protect your company’s social accounts

Enterprise social media protection and compliance startup Nexgate has raised $3.5 million in its first round of funding to protect businesses’ social media accounts from spam and hijacking, the company announced today. The new funding was led by Sierra Ventures, which focuses its efforts on early-state capital investment. Nexgate used to be called Social iQ Networks, and it launched a full enterprise suite in 2012 focused on discovering, protecting, and ensuring compliance for social media accounts associated with companies. Nexgate said its service is in use by “dozen multinational and enterprise” companies, but it hopes to push its service out to many more customers and improve its technology. Read the full story on VentureBeat.

Eduson.tv brings business education to professionals in emerging economies with $1M in funding

As Brazil, Russia, India, and China advance towards the next stage of economic development, people in those countries want to advance their careers as well. Eduson.tv launched an online business education portal geared towards people in BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) countries to help them improve their skill sets and earn a degree. The company raised $1 million from abel invests, including the founders of Groupon Russia. Although one-third of the courses are free, others charge enrollment fees and Eduson pays royalties to the lecturers. The goal is to add one new course a week. Read the full story on VentureBeat.

Laughing baby image via Shutterstock

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