Lymbix has made a clever tool called ToneCheck that pre-screens the tone of your emails so that you say exactly what you mean to say. That has enabled the company to raise $1.35 million in funding from GrowthWorks Atlantic Venture Fund.

The Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada-based company launched its second-generation ToneCheck program on March 9, billing it as a kind of spellchecker to fix the tone of your messages. The company heads off those moments of unintended passion, when someone interprets a tone-deaf email the wrong way. It’s a very interesting application of artificial intelligence that can make for happier employees, satisfied customers, and better work processes.

ToneCheck uses artificial intelligence to decipher the emotional tone of your sentences and alerts you to any “negative message” you may unwittingly be sending out. The company’s ToneCheck program is like a spell checker, fixing the tone of your messages so they match your intentions.

Getting help with communications is increasingly important because people are using email and other non-direct communications more frequently. And since the emotion behind written text can be misunderstood, people need more assistance in the form of a gut check or reminder in order to safely send a higher volume of email messages. It offers feedback in real-time and can offer guidance in a granular fashion on tonality related to friendliness, enjoyment, amusement, contentment, sadness, anger, fear, and shame.

Lymbix calls this technology “real-time sentiment analytics.”

Lymbix, is one of 200 companies that have been accepted into Microsoft’s BizSpark One program. Lymbix will use the money to ramp up its sales and invest in innovation.

Lymbix was founded in February, 2009, and has 13 employees. Rivals include Lexalytics in sentiment analysis, but there is no direct competition for ToneCheck itself. The company had previously raised $2.4 million in seed and angel funding. Matt Eldridge co-founded the company after he had a bout of trouble getting his tone right in email communications. When he wanted to appear excited, he was often coming off as pushy or aggressive. That was particularly true when Eldridge was trying to close franchising deals for his former employer. His co-founder is Josh Merchant, chief technology officer.