The online video delivery platform Brightcove today announced new technology that defeats software that blocks video ads on desktop and mobile devices.

The anti-ad-blocking capability is part of Brightcove Lift, the company’s ad optimization solution, which helps companies maximize the revenues they see from video ads placed on the desktop and mobile.

Brightcove provides an HTML5 video player into which it serves its clients’ videos in the mobile or desktop browser, and serves the ads around them.

Brightcove said the technology “stitches” ads into video content streams in the cloud, making them harder to isolate and block. These continuous video streams also keep viewers watching by reducing buffering times between the video and the ads, Brightcove said.

eMarketer analyst Paul Verna believes that while Brightcove’s server-side ad insertion provides a technical approach to dealing with ad blockers, it’s only a first step.

“Ultimately, the best way to discourage people from using ad blockers is to deliver a top-notch experience,” Verna said. “That’s the part that too many publishers, marketers, and tech firms have overlooked, so it’s important that they zero in on it.”

Circumventing ad blockers is a high-stakes game. Marketers are desperate to communicate with millennials in any way they can, and millennials are more likely than other consumers to watch video on mobile devices. They’re also more likely to use ad blockers.

Brightcove said companies using Brightcove Lift have seen the number of their video ads delivered after the viewer hits play increase by “as much as 50 percent.”

Lift can also be integrated with many popular third-party ad-insertion and analytics platforms.

“Consumers have long embraced free content in exchange for ads, and it is important to preserve this model in order for consumers to continue to have access to the range of free video content available today,” said Brightcove CEO David Mendels in a statement.

Brightcove was founded in 2004 and now delivers and monetizes video for 5,500 customers in 70 countries, according to the company’s website.