Google today announced the beta release of its Cloud Job Discovery service, which uses artificial intelligence to help customers connect job vacancies with the people who can fill them.

Formerly known as the Cloud Jobs API, the system is designed to take information about open positions and help job seekers take better advantage of it. For example, Cloud Job Discovery can take a plain language query and help translate that to the specific jargon employers use to describe their positions, something that can be hard for potential employees to navigate.

As part of this beta release, Google announced that Cloud Job Discovery is now designed to work with applicant-tracking systems and staffing agencies, in addition to job boards and career site providers like CareerBuilder.

It also now works in 100 languages. While the service is still primarily aimed at customers in the U.S., some of Google’s existing clients need support for multiple languages. In the future, the company plans to expand the Cloud Job Discovery service internationally, so investing in language support now makes sense going forward.

The system has been available in early access for the past 10 months, and in that time it has been picked up by providers like Jibe, which makes recruiting software. Jibe’s Cloud Job Discovery-enabled software provided Johnson & Johnson with 41 percent more high-quality applicants for business critical roles and 45 percent increased clickthroughs on its career site.

Those improvements came about without any other alterations to the recruiting software, according to Tarquin Clark, a group manager at Google.

Expanding Cloud Job Discovery is part of Google’s overall jobs push. Earlier this year, the company launched a Job Search service designed to collect information from repositories of job descriptions and make that available to job seekers through the company’s search offerings.

The company is still working on the pricing model for its new service, Clark said. Google will release full pricing details when Cloud Job Discovery becomes generally available, which he expects will happen sometime next year.