Though other smartwatch makers have recently debuted smaller and more conventional designs, the latest Diesel On series watch — Full Guard 2.5 — is unapologetically moving in the opposite direction. Based on Google’s Wear OS, the sequel to last year’s Full Guard is even larger and flashier than before, with a design that will certainly draw envious glances.

With a roughly 47mm by 56mm by 11mm case size, Full Guard 2.5 features a 1.39-inch, 454-by-454 resolution screen and the sort of rugged metallic body that looks like it could withstand anything — including water. Unlike its predecessor, it’s safe for showers, swimming, and diving to 30-meter depths; it also includes a heart rate sensor, GPS, and NFC for contactless payments. But with a body 8mm larger than its predecessor, it’s a pretty big chunk of metal, and the largest Wear OS watch around.

Perhaps the coolest feature of Full Guard 2.5 is its latest neon watch face, Flicker, which cycles through colors throughout the day and features bold, glowing analog time indicators. Additional watch faces, including earlier neon options, are also included, alongside recently updated Wear OS features: the redesigned Google Fit, more proactive Google Assistant, and support for third-party apps.

If there’s any huge bummer in the design, it’s Diesel’s choice of Qualcomm’s last-generation Snapdragon 2100 chip, paired with 512MB of RAM and 4GB of storage capacity. Despite the huge casing size, Full Guard 2.5 promises only one to two days of battery life, offset with a quick one-hour charging feature. These specs place Diesel’s design markedly behind Samsung’s just-announced Galaxy Watch, with a similar likelihood of distance from whatever Qualcomm and Google will announce as their late 2018 flagships.

Diesel will offer Full Guard 2.5 in four styles: Matte steel with black leather strap, gunmetal with brown leather strap, and matte black steel with black silicone strap will sell for $325 each, while gunmetal steel with a gunmetal link bracelet will sell for $350. All four versions will be available to purchase in October.


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