Security is top of mind for most enterprises, and not without good reason. In 2017, there were approximately 16.7 million victims of identity fraud — a record year-on-year high. And the most common method by which attackers compromise organizations today is phishing and social engineering, according to Trustwave.

That’s why Dropbox is rising to meet the cybersecurity needs of the more than 300,000 teams using its corporate tier, Dropbox Business. The San Francisco firm this week announced a security-focused collaboration with Google Cloud Identity and expanded partnerships with BetterCloud, Proofpoint, Coronet, and Sailpoint, all of which have built integrations that enhance Dropbox Business’ management capabilities.

“Business collaboration today happens everywhere, in and out of the office, and across multiple devices,” Dropbox said. “The management and visibility tools provided by each of these partners complement native Dropbox Business security features already designed to serve the smallest business to the largest Fortune 500 company.”

Here’s what each of its partners is bringing to the table:

  • Google Cloud Identity‘s plugin will allow Dropbox admins to manage account access, and allow users to access their Dropbox accounts using Google login credentials with multi-factor authentication (including two-step notification and one-time passwords).
  • BetterCloud‘s integration will enable Dropbox Business customers to create custom and automated workflows, insights, alerts, and actions based on their (and their team’s) usage.
  • Cornet users will gain the ability to create access policies for content and remediate violations. They’ll also be able to control sharing permissions to restrict suspicious Dropbox links or folders.
  • Proofpoint’s tie-in will let users create data loss prevention policies in Dropbox Business, specifically by helping to detect accounts at risk of breach and identifying and quarantining potential file risks in through sandboxing.
  • Sailpoint‘s tie-in with Dropbox Business will make it easier for managers to monitor processes across cloud, mobile, and on-premises environments. It’ll also expose access controls to Dropbox via Sailpoint’s SecurityIQ, and configuration settings for single sign-on with IdentityIQ and IdentityNow.

All five are expected to be available by the end of the year.

“With integrations among these new partner capabilities, admins can more easily control identity access, govern data, manage devices, and oversee security processes when employees and teams use Dropbox,” the company said.

Today’s announcement comes days after the launch of Extensions, a new Dropbox feature that enables users to work with third-party applications and tools directly in the cloud storage service’s web environment. Apps from Adobe, Nitro, Vimeo, HelloFax, DocuSign, AirSlate, HelloSign, Pixlr, and SmallPDF let users perform tasks like share a PDF or Word documents externally, edit a photo, or request an eSignature — all without leaving Dropbox proper.

They’re the latest in a string of third-party partnerships and integrations the company’s announced recently.

In March, it took the wraps off a tie-in with Salesforce that lets customers share files stored in Dropbox through Salesforce’s Quip document processing service and create customized external Dropbox folders. That same month, it teamed up with Google’s G Suite to allow users to store, share, and preview Docs, Sheets, and Slides within Gmail, Hangouts Chat, and Dropbox’s ecosystem, to make it easier to share and preview files.

Both followed similar deals with Box and Microsoft’s Office 365.

In related news, Dropbox in July increased the storage space for its paid tiers by 1 terabyte for no additional charge; Dropbox Professional users got a bump from 1TB to 2TB, and Dropbox Business users went from 2TB to 3TB.

Dropbox Business plans start at $12.50 per user per month. Unlimited storage costs $20 per user per month.